Order Pickup
Order Delivery Sunset Harbour
Order Delivery Brickell Order GrubHub

DIRT: Eating Clean Just Got Way More Delicious

Eating healthy isn’t something that comes easy for us. As food bloggers, it’s especially difficult to follow a “clean eating” plan when we’re bombarded with unhealthy delicious creations left and right. Who has time for fruit bowls, smoothies and wraps? No, thank you.

It wasn’t until we came across DIRT last month that our mindset made a 180-degree turn. The team behind the new healthy eatery on Miami Beach has figured out a way to make eating clean a satisfying and tasty experience — and one worth repeating. In other words, DIRT makes us wish all healthy food tasted this good.

Located on 232 5th Street, DIRT’s kitchen is led by a familiar face in the Miami food scene: Chef Nicole Votano, formerly of Downtown Miami’s Fooq’s. She’s developed a seasonal menu full of variety and flavor that perfectly reflects the restaurant’s goal of delivering innovative, delicious and healthful cuisine — all in an uplifting environment. You can’t help but feel healthy the second you set foot into the place, and that feeling is amplified a hundredfold once you try the offerings.

When we say the menu is full of variety, we mean it. The extensive selections span breakfast, lunch and dinner; there’s everything from light bites such as toasts and bowls to heartier fare like seasonal plates, sandwiches and wraps. Looking for vegan, vegetarian, paleo and gluten-free options? They have all those bases covered, too; they’ve left no stone unturned.

In our experience, restaurants that offer so many different options have a tough time maintaining quality across the board. It sometimes feels like certain things on such an extensive menu are really well-thought out while other selections are put on the menu just to offer them — they’re afterthoughts. That’s not the case at DIRT, where everything on the menu has a rhyme and reason. Chef Votano has put a lot of effort and love into the menu, and we’re sure each plate tastes as good as it sounds. How do we know this? We ate a lot.

Like we mentioned earlier, not only does the food taste good, but you just feel good, too. After starting our meal with two tasty smoothies — the Recover and Defense — we were ready to seize the day with new-found energy. The former with its strawberries, cucumber, watermelon, lime and Bee Free Honee made for a refreshing thirst-quencher that we could have day after day. Despite its description, it was perfectly balanced — it’s not as sweet as you’d expect but just enough to appease your taste buds. The Defense smoothie with its blueberries, pineapple, mango and acai was equally awesome and perfect for the South Florida heat.

As for food, the dragon fruit bowl is a vibrant, colorful dish that’s a satisfying portion size; it’s so flavorful and filling that you could totally have a bit for breakfast and save the rest for later. There are so many components to the bowl: Dragon fruit, banana, and pineapple, blended with almond & Brazil nut mylk, and topped with blueberries, banana, kiwi, granola. Not one ingredient feels out of place, though. It all mixes together so well.

A quick word about toast: toast isn’t exactly the most exciting thing to eat, so you may be tempted to skip this section of the menu. Under no circumstances should you do that. At DIRT, the toasts are mind-blowing. Yes, we just used mind-blowing to describe toast. Yes, you may have a hard time believing that, but trust us.

One bite into the almond butter and strawberry jam toast, and you’ll be singing its praises, too. An all-around excellent light bite, this unassuming spread on Zak the Baker bread paced a flavorful wallop. We couldn’t believe something so simple could be this good.

Our heartier fare was just as impressive. The crispy fish po’boy with quinoa-crusted fish and zucchini jalapeno slaw will fill you up without filling you out while delivering an appetizing kick and crunch. We still think about the crusty bread all the time.

Since the menu changes seasonally, we had to order the winter plate before it got swapped out. The dish — root vegetable mash with grilled kale and your choice of protein — tasted like winter. There was really no other way to describe it. If winter tasted like something, it would taste like this heavenly creation. We opted for grass-fed butcher’s cut steak, and holy crap that was some good meat.

We walked out of DIRT with full and happy stomachs. But although we were full, we didn’t hate ourselves like we do after other meals. We felt good and energized for once. Chef Votano and the DIRT team have changed our minds about healthy food — it can be nutritious and tasty. We’re pretty sure DIRT will convert you, too.

We Uncovered the Best Secret Menu Items in Miami

Article by Matt Meltzer

Iced Relax Tea

Dirt
South Beach

Even if you look at a menu that touts its options for raw, vegan, and paleo eaters and think “That rabbit food ain’t for me!”, there’s still something for you at Dirt. Stop by after a long day on the beach to cool off with this iced tea made with chamomile, rooibus, and lavender, then mixed with ruby red Florida grapefruit juice, and Madagascar vanilla simple syrup.

For full article visit:
https://www.thrillist.com/eat/miami/secret-menu-items-in-miami-off-menu-food-and-drinks

 

The Cleanest Sandwich in Miami Beach is At a Place Called DIRT

At the end of 2015, a new little eatery opened in South Beach called DIRT. The concept was simple: serving up clean, nourishing food designed by a serious chef in a fast, casual environment. A bastion of healthy food amongst many delicious, but not conscientious options in Miami Beach, DIRT offers meals free of pesticides, hormones, and unnecessary grease. They are open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and cater to the discriminating omnivore as much as vegetarians.

Ordering in the small but chic resto starts casually at the marble slab counter. Select a beverage, which can range from a hand-crafted espresso-based drink made with DIRT’s private-label coffee, cold-pressed juice, homemade kombucha, hibiscus and raspberry tea to one of four local, craft beers on tap. See… something for everybody.

Depending on what time of day it is, depends on what happens next. Breakfast will look something like this:  local eggs from Sun Fresh Farm and Ranch on crunchy Zak the Baker multigrain toast or herb farro drizzled with olive oil with avocado, kale, caramelized onions, or roasted fennel. Topped off with organic pepperjack cheese or house-made chicken apple sausage, you can see why weekends have breakfast lines going down the block.

If it all sounds amazing. It is—thanks to real chefs in the kitchen. The Executive Chef is Jonathan Seningen and Chef de Cuisine is Nicole Votano who both work on making the food as good as it sounds, and sometimes better. Lunch includes veggie-centric potions like bowls.

“I am really loving our seasonal bowl right now,” says Chef Nicole. “It starts with a butternut squash cashew ‘cream’ which is topped with roasted vadouvan curry cauliflower, quinoa, and arugula. It’s then finished off with pomegranate and spiced pumpkin seeds for some crunchy texture. It’s the kind of dish that even a carnivore can eat without missing the meat.”

Of course, proteins are on the menu and are of the highest quality available, and can be added on to most dishes (instead of subtracted), which makes both vegetarians and meat-eaters happy.

“Guests will know exactly what they’re eating-nutritional information and ingredient origin will be displayed in the restaurant, online, and on printed menus. A focal point of the restaurant will be a large display used to inform guests about the origin of our ingredients. It will also highlight local vendors and partners with whom we work closely,” says Co-Founder and General Manager Jeff LaTulippe.

How to keep alcohol flowing at fast casuals

How to add alcohol to the fast-casual lane without causing a traffic jam.
By Thomas Henry Strenk 

When fast-casual operators attempt to bump up checks by offering something harder than soft drinks, they can’t neglect the “fast” part of the equation. Throughput is what it’s all about.

“Alcohol offerings can drive traffic and increase average checks,” says Donna Hood Crecca, associate principal at Technomic. But “speed of service is crucial in the fast-casual environment, so drink-making processes must be streamlined yet deliver on consistency and quality.”

Many fast-casual operators are experimenting with different strategies to sell these beverages in a counter-service environment, most often without a dedicated bar. There’s no one right answer as to how to do it, and approaches are evolving. Taking up the bibulous challenge are several operators who are discovering that profitable sweet spot between fast and casual.

Finding a format that fits

Pasadena, Calif.-based Dog Haus International is a fast-casual concept serving craft hot dogs, sausages and burgers. Guests can choose from signature creations such as the Grand Slam (a hot dog with smoked bacon, fried egg, tater tots and maple-syrup Sriracha) or customize from a selection of more than 40 toppings. “Nothing goes better with gourmet hot dogs or burgers than craft beer,” says Quasim Riaz, a partner in the venture.

Currently, there are 12 units, and the chain has several strategies for dispensing alcohol, depending upon store size and configuration, customer demographics and licensing costs, among other factors. Its newest application is a freestanding, self-serve beer dispenser. “We like the system because, in theory, it will increase throughput,” says Riaz. The counter person just hands over a cup and an RFID card, and the customer mulls over the beer choices—away from the ordering line—and taps his [or her] own beer. Guests don’t need to wait in line again for a refill, either.

Wine service at Dog Haus is fast and efficient thanks to canned product. No need for staffers to struggle drawing a cork; they just give the guests a can of vino and a glass. Stores that don’t have tap systems, either self-serve or behind the counter, offer canned beer as well. The packaging stacks better and takes up less storage space than bottles, and there’s less breakage, says Raiz.

Two Dog Haus restaurants have a separate bar area, and a new unit opening in Las Vegas will serve cocktails as well. During busy periods, the full bar is manned by a dedicated staffer. Higher sales offset any extra labor costs, says Riaz, who adds, “Throughput is not affected.”

Counter options

“From a practical business perspective, we wanted to build our dinnertime traffic and our brunch and weekend business by offering beer, wine and cocktails,” says Jeff LaTulippe, co-founder and GM of fast-casual DIRT, a farm-to-counter restaurant in Miami Beach, Fla.

DIRT is aimed at health-conscious consumers with its vegetable-forward menu items. For example, a seasonal bowl of roasted curry cauliflower, quinoa and arugula with butternut squash cashew “cream” is finished with pomegranate arils and spiced pumpkin seeds. Drinks follow the same philosophy as the food: The four craft beers on tap all are local, wines are from small, sustainable vineyards and sake for cocktails is from artisanal producers.

Instead of a single station, DIRT installed two ordering counters as the chief means of increasing throughput. Customers who just want something to drink—including nonalchoholic cold-pressed juices, smoothies, tea, cold-brew coffee and kombucha—can proceed directly to the beverage counter, which reduces congestion at the food counter and shortens the line. Any drinks ordered at the food counter are relayed via linked POS units to the beverage area so that customers can pick those up right away before heading to their tables to await their food order. A roaming staffer with an ordering tablet asks guests if they would like another beverage, which helps boost checks.

The beverage counter is set up for efficiency. Within a few steps of the register and easily accessible to the server are beer taps, a bucket holding chilled bottles of white and rose wines and an assortment of reds—ready to pour and go. The display encourages impulse purchases, says LaTulippe.

DIRT’s cocktails are simply made by spiking the cold-pressed juices and cold-brew coffee with wine and sake to make lower-alcohol shims. Cross-utilizing the beverages reduces prep labor, and the drinks are a little healthier than the typical cocktail, says LaTulippe. Another factor in the decision to offer shims was that sake falls under the beer and wine license, which is less expensive to purchase than a full liquor license.

Cocktail components are batched and ready to go in under-counter refrigerators. The alcohol drinks, says LaTulippe, are no more difficult nor time-consuming to prepare than other beverages, so there is no problem with throughput. 

Here's Where to Find the Best Açaí Bowls in Miami

By Greyceli Marin | Originally appears in Miami Eater

Raise your hand if you know what an açaí palm is. Now raise your hand if you love açaí bowls. You can remain anonymous, but it's safe to say your hand only went up once.

But to be fair, and much like the indigenous people of the Brazilian Amazon, açaí is a staple in your diet, right? But unlike them, you might not always know where to get it.

Here are 9 places in Miami where you can get your much needed açaí fix, and other things you'll order on the side because you always underestimate how full the bowl alone actually gets you.

 DIRT

Health forward restaurants are on the rise and DIRT is ahead of the pack. It's only been open a few months, but there's already a lot of buzz around its quinoa and veggie bowls, cold-pressed juices and sandwiches, all delivered in true farm-to-counter fashion.

Linda Gassenheimer Eats at 'DIRT' /Eat Clean/ Restaurant

By Linda Gassenheimer | Originally appears in wlrn.org

01/14/16 -1:30- Syndicated food columnist Linda Gassenheimer, Special wine correspondent Fred Tasker and WLRN hosts Joseph Cooper and Bonnie Berman interview DIRT (Eat Clean) Restaurant General Manager Jeff Latulippe and Chef Nicole Votano.  We hear tips on how to spice up our resolutions to eat right and lose weight this year. Are we losing resolve two weeks into the New Year?  They give us tips on how to create great food that happens to be healthy, too. The restaurant serves fresh “farm-to-counter” food quickly and affordably. 

Listen to full interveiw HERE

Eat Clean @ DIRT on South Beach

Originally appears in Lifestyle Miami

DIRT is a new restaurant taking over Miami Beach.  Having opened their doors just a few weeks ago, they’ve acquired over 2000 followers on Instagram, a large customer base, and strong ties with the community.  DIRT is located between Collins and Washington Avenue, and provides a healthier, more refreshing way to split your time between land and sea.  They are committed to telling you the truth about your food, whether it’s about the ingredients, the way it’s processed, or the locations of the farms themselves.  With a positive concept and a dedication to working with locals, DIRT is more like a welcoming community than just another fast-casual restaurant.  

Their most popular dishes include their vegan seasonal options (Autumn Bowl, Autumn Plate, DIRT x lululemon Autumn Salad), as well as the Nourish Salad and the DIRTy Steak + Cheese.  Jeff LaTulippe, the Co-Founder and General Manager of DIRT, says of these, “the Nourish Salad comes with sprouted chickpeas and lentils, roasted curried cauliflower, house-made mole vinaigrette and cucumber mint yogurt.  The DIRTy Steak + Cheese is a very hearty sandwich made with grass-fed steak, jalapeno Monterey jack cheese, caramelized onions, sunflower sprouts, and a horseradish “aioli”.  Eggs or a protein can be added to any of the vegan options.  In order to accommodate growing dietary preferences, DIRT includes vegan, gluten-free, and paleo menus.  

DIRT works hard to get local ingredients.  They want to be sure of their product’s source before giving it to the customer.  “Some of the relationships with farmers have developed over years of working in the Miami culinary scene. Others have developed more quickly as farmers and other local vendors have heard about our concept and said, “I have a farm. Can I have you come check it out or send you some samples?”  DIRT’s transparency helps us to make more informed decisions about our food, without feeling like we’re in a lecture.  

One example of a relationship DIRT has developed with farmers, is that of their egg purveyor, Sun Fresh Farm and Ranch.  “Chef Nicole met the owner, Jeremy, at a farmers market in Pinecrest. He was not selling wholesale yet, but she supported him by buying small amounts of kale, tomatoes, and green beans until he was ready to sell his amazing eggs.”  DIRT now uses these eggs exclusively.  

Hosting community events is an important part of DIRT’s mission.  Currently, they partner with Feeding South Florida, which provides snacks and other food items to children in need.  This “Backpack Program” aims to increase children’s access to food when school is not in session.  DIRT donates 1% of their sales to the cause.  DIRT has also worked with local yoga instructors who run “Transcend Miami Beach”, a yoga, meditation, and life coaching event.  LaTulippe says, “We created a new cold-pressed juice called TRANSCEND for everyone who attended the event [ingredients: watermelon, beets, coconut water, lime, vanilla bean, alkaline water] — we’re now selling the juice in stores.”  

Just recently, Chef Nicole participated in Swank Specialty Produce’s “Swank Table Farmer’s Market Dinner”.  This event benefitted Season to Share, an organization that provides financial assistance to local families in need.  In the near future, DIRT is planning to serve a multi-course dinner with tea pairings by Chef Nicole and JoJo Tea.

LaTulippe says, “Each season we will continue to have a new seasonal plate, bowl, and salad. For Autumn, we partnered with Cristina Ramirez, lululemon’s local community ambassador, to develop our seasonal salad.  Going forward, we will continue this type of collaboration with other members of the local health and wellness community.”


DIRT- Where Clean Eating Coexists With Great Taste

 By Katy Patao | Originally appears in Rando Miami

I have to admit, I was extremely excited when I found out about DIRT several months ago. Even though there are a ton of great restaurants in Miami in every corner, there wasn't really a spot where I could go for really good for me type of food that wasn't overpriced, and in a sit-down setting. Well, that is, until DIRT opened its doors last month.

DIRT is focused on bringing “fine food fast” to South Beach. They are a farm-to-counter eatery that is offering healthy, chef-driven, modern American fare to Miami. Even though you may you look at my Instagram feed and not believe me - I am actually pretty health-conscious. DIRT is catering to those consumers who are into feeding their body the good stuff - locally-sourced, vegetable-forward and in a fast pace environment.  

Let’s talk about the menu, or menus in this case. When you walk in you are going to have several menus to choose from, depending on your diet. You will have a paleo, vegan, vegetarian, and gluten-free menus to choose from.

When I visited DIRT I knew I wanted to try a few items that had previously caught my eye. The first dish I knew I needed to try was the DIRT Autumn Bowl, which I decided to add grass-fed beef tenderloin to. 

Then I decided to make my own salad, which was a lot of fun. I went ahead with the nourish salad, which comes packed with chickpeas, lentils, roasted curried cauliflower, caramelized onions, roasted red pepper, golden raisins, carrot, mole vinaigrette, and cucumber mint yogurt. So much yum in this salad. Oh, plus I added free-range orange basil chicken.

Lastly, the Crispy Fish Po’Boy. So incredibly amazing I wish I could eat it everyday. This quinoa-crusted day boat fish is absolutely perfect when mixed with the flavors of the zucchini jalapeño slaw and Greek yogurt remoulade. 

If you aren't a regular at DIRT yet then you are missing out.

Dirt Offers Miami Diners “Clean Eating” With a Chef-Driven Twist

Article by Keri Adams | Originally appeared in Foodable WebTV network

Even though Miami is a city filled with thousands of diverse culinary options, the city isn’t necessarily known for an abundance of health-focused concepts like you would find in, say, L.A. As a whole, the local restaurant scene has catered to the health trend with increased healthier options available on menus. But what about restaurants with completely guilt-free menus?

In many cities on the west coast, veggie-centric eateries are sprinkled all over, but not so much in Miami. Enter: Dirt, which set up shop in South Beach a few weeks ago. This brand new concept — with a mantra to “eat clean” — aims to deliver healthy, farm-to-table, fine-dine quality food, with faster service at a more approachable price point. (Aside from bottles of wine and factoring in add-ons, the most expensive thing on the menu will run you $16.)

The Real Meaning of “Eat Clean”

Words such as “fresh,” “local,” and “quality” have popped up on menus at restaurants where these terms don’t even belong. They are vague, have become trendy, and are being used to sway consumers.

But these words are more than hot button words at Dirt. The co-founders Jeff Latulippe and Matt Ernst, along with chefs Jonathan Seningen and Nicole Votano, have spent a considerable amount of time sourcing the best ingredients, while preparing a locally seasonal menu that offers options for diners with dietary restrictions of all kinds.

Dirt offers separate menus for paleo, vegan, and gluten-free eaters. Diners can pick up one of these menus and not be concerned about finding limited options for their needs. Instead, they have an array of options that they can trust to fulfill their dietary requirements.

“One of the other big differentiators for us is transparency,” says Jeff Latulippe, co-founder and general manager at Dirt. “We have this big copper wall that shows where a lot of our food is coming from. So, we wanted to take the chalkboard list that you see in a lot of places and bring it up a notch, and show you a map of Florida and the world, and show you where we are getting ingredients from, not only locally but nationally and sometimes internationally, and what exactly we are getting from those suppliers.”

With the changing landscape of fast-casual and good-for-you restaurants, new concepts must not only find ways to differentiate, but also be able to evolve amidst an ever-evolving landscape driven by consumer habits and demands.

“The merging of fine-dining, chef-driven food with healthy food is a unique aspect of what we are doing,” says Latulippe. “We’re not trying to be like a generic healthy place that just serves brown rice and chicken.”

Just because the concept stresses “eat clean” doesn’t mean Dirt serves boring and bland meals.

“You can come here if you are not a person who is consumed with just health and you’re not digging down into that nutritional index of each product we serve,” says Matt Ernst, co-founder and operating partner at Dirt. “You can still come in and get a Dirty Steak & Cheese and it’s got really well-sourced and well-prepared ingredients in a unique way.”

Co-founders Matt Ernst and Jeff Latulippe Kerri Adams for Foodable WebTV Network

New Restaurateur Challenges

Starting a restaurant is no walk in the park. The two founders used Danny Meyer’s book, “Setting the Table” as a guide, but there were still some hiccups in the restaurant startup phase.

“The biggest challenge was definitely the fact that we are in a historical Art Deco district and there were tons of restrictions on permitting, construction, and all sorts of approvals we needed on our design, particularly our exterior design,” says Ernst. This delayed the opening of the restaurant for months.

Besides construction and permitting challenges, both co-founders are new to the restaurant business. “Jeff and I are both new restaurateurs. While we understand business, branding, marketing, and systems, we’re trying to do something new that really hasn’t been done down here before, and figuring out all the challenges that make that work — from sourcing to getting food out fast enough, while bringing up a new set of employees from all walks of life,” Ernst says.

Restaurant Technology

Just because Latulippe and Ernst are new restaurateurs doesn’t mean they didn’t do their research or have background in important operational sectors. Ernst’s background is in technology, so Dirt is using the latest restaurant technology to make their operations easier in multiple ways. “The level of sophistication in software and analytics that has come from the restaurant space in the last five years is impressive,” Ernst says.

Some of the many vendors they’re using are Revel’s iPad POS software, LevelUp’s mobile loyalty and payments software, Swipely’s analytics software, and HotSchedules, an online employee scheduling software. Dirt is also jumping on the delivery bandwagon with third-party services like Delivery Dudes and Postmates. “We are really trying to use restaurant technology as much as possible in every way,” says Latulippe.

Dirt's exterior with outside seating Kerri Adams for Foodable WebTV Network

The Location

Why did the co-founders decide on Miami as the first Dirt location?

“We saw it as a huge market need here in Miami and a lot of people travel to South Beach. We hope to take this in other markets and it will have a little bit of brand recognition,” says Ernst. “We already have had people from New York, L.A., and Paris say ‘can you bring this to our cities?’ We think if we can prove it here, it has life to go other places.”

Partnerships With Wellness Brands

Latulippe and Ernst are cleverly aligning themselves with wellness brands, such as Lululemon with the Dirt x Lululemon Salad by Christina.

“We met Christina in the process of opening the restaurant and she is the community ambassador for the Lululemon on Lincoln Road. So we said, ‘Christina, what’s your favorite fall salad, tell us the ingredients.’ So she gave us a really awesome list of ingredients and then our chefs made up this awesome salad. It’s actually our best-selling salad,” Latulippe says.

With every new seasonal menu, the restaurant plans to offer a collaborative menu option like this.

So with this new health-focused concept paving the way in Miami, will we be seeing more restaurants like this in the area soon? Are we on the brink of a veggie-centric culinary revolution? Only time will tell.

Food and Beverage Magazine: DIRT Bringing “Fine Food Fast” to South Beach

The farm-to-counter eatery will offer healthy, chef-driven, modern American fare

Located on Fifth Street between Collins and Washington Avenues, DIRT‘s mission is simple and straightforward: to create innovative, delicious, healthy cuisine that you can feel good about putting into your body. DIRT is committed to serving up its local, sustainable food with an emphasis on personal, warm hospitality. The environment complements the food perfectly-it’s bright, sleek, and uplifting.

With Executive Chef Jonathan Seningen and Director of Operations and Chef de Cuisine Nicole Votano  leading the kitchen, guests can enjoy DIRT’s chef-driven fare at any time of day. Breakfast will offer a wide variety of options, including savory or sweet market-run oatmeal. Chefs Jonathan and Nicole will collaborate to create each day’s flavors based on what is at peak quality each day: picture black truffle-scented oatmeal with English peas and Parmigiano Reggiano topped with a fried egg, or sweet oatmeal spiked with honey-roasted pineapple, toasted coconut, and dried cranberries. Mornings will also feature a “create your own” option: start with local eggs from Sun Fresh Farm and Ranch on crunchy Zak the Baker multigrain toast or herb farro drizzled with olive oil; then add avocado, kale, caramelized onions, or roasted fennel; and if that’s not enough, you can top off your sandwich or bowl with organic pepperjack cheese or house-made chicken apple sausage.

Lunch will include a vast assortment of vegetable-centric options, as well as a few classics with a healthful culinary twist. “I am really loving our seasonal bowl right now,” says Chef Nicole. “It starts with a butternut squash cashew ‘cream’ which is topped with roasted vadouvan curry cauliflower, quinoa, and arugula. It’s then finished off with pomegranate and spiced pumpkin seeds for some crunchy texture. It’s the kind of dish that even a carnivore can eat without missing the meat.”

DIRT has also carefully planned its beverage program, starting with highly skilled baristas who will handcraft espresso-based drinks using DIRT‘s very own private label coffee (house-made nut milk available at no extra charge). Not a coffee drinker? Start your day off with a chef-driven smoothie, cold-pressed juice, or a cup of JoJo tea instead. For a nightcap and during weekend brunch, DIRT will serve a very unique selection of wine and sake cocktails created by Chef Jonathan, in addition to 4 local beers on tap.

Transparency is also a vital part of DIRT‘s core values-all ingredients have been carefully selected by the two chefs. “Guests will know exactly what they’re eating-nutritional information and ingredient origin will be displayed in the restaurant, online, and on printed menus. A focal point of the restaurant will be a large display used to inform guests about the origin of our ingredients. It will also highlight local vendors and partners with whom we work closely,” says Co-Founder and General Manager Jeff LaTulippe.

“We’re offering our guests a vast array of options,” LaTulippe continues. “There’s something for every dietary restriction or personal preference-paleo, vegan, pescatarian, gluten-free, you name it. But the best part is it’s all delicious, approachable, and clean, down-to-earth cuisine…that’s why we call it DIRT.”

“We want to elevate the idea of what a counter-service restaurant could be, and we want our guests to enjoy themselves no matter what they choose to eat or drink,” says Chef Jonathan. “We’ve put just as much care into selecting our sustainable wines and crafting refreshing cocktails as we’ve put into creating our salads, juices, and breakfast bowls.”

Prior to co-founding DIRT, Chef Jonathan spent nearly 25 years crafting inventive, sustainable cuisine. He was most recently Executive Chef at Elizabeth’s Gone Raw, Washington, D.C.’s premier vegan eatery, after cutting his teeth in some of the finest kitchens in New York City (Atlas, Artisanal, and Chanterelle) and Washington, D.C. (Le Paradou, Hook, OYA, and SAX).

Chef Nicole began her career at Bradley Ogden’s One Market Restaurant in San Francisco before moving on to the Biltmore Hotel, Michelle Bernstein Catering, and the fast casual Crumb on Parchment, where she was also Executive Chef. Chef Nicole most recently helmed the kitchen at Fooq’s in downtown Miami, which she helped build from the ground up, during which time she was included in Modern Luxury’s 2015 “5 Chefs to Watch”.

Beyond its sustainable approach to food, DIRT has already embraced a charitable approach to the community. The restaurant has established a relationship with Feeding South Florida and has pledged to donate the equivalent of 1% of its sales to the non-profit organization from the day the doors open. DIRT will donate healthy grab-and-go items to support Feeding South Florida’s Backpack Program, which provides food packs for children who don’t have access to meals over the weekend.

In addition to DIRT‘s commitment to delicious food and philanthropy, the eatery is the only restaurant south of Orlando to earn certification by the United States Healthful Food Council’s Responsible Epicurean and Agricultural Leadership (REAL) program, a nationally recognized mark of excellence for environmental stewardship, high-quality sourcing, and holistic nutrition.

DIRT opens on Monday, November 23, 2015. Its located at 232 5th Street (between Collins Avenue and Washington Avenue), Miami Beach, FL, 33139. DIRT will be open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Miami City Social: Dirt opens at South Beach

Written by Patrick Jeary | Originally appeared in Miami City Social

DIRT is a new "fine food fast" restaurant located in the heart of South Beach. They are a farm-to-counter eatery and wellness bar that brings food back to its roots. Their chef-driven menu includes local, sustainable, and healthy ingredients that are cultivated from the ground and masterfully prepared to bring out the beauty of their natural flavors. Fresh fruits and vegetables, pasture-raised and grass-fed meats, wild-caught seafood, hearty baked goods and more all come together in a destination that’s friendly, approachable, and enjoyable, proving that "good food," "good for you," and "good for the planet" can co-exist in a casual, comfortable atmosphere. Here is more information about DIRT :

 

According to New Times :

"Though offering healthful options, the menu remains full of flavor with dishes such as the purity bowl ($12) — filled with açaí, strawberries, chia seeds, goji berries, almond and Brazil nut mylk, kiwi, banana, and granola — and the detox salad ($9), which starts with a base of grains or greens and adds roasted beets, shaved fennel, orange wedges, goat cheese, and toasted hazelnuts. Add a protein like grass-fed beef tenderloin ($7), free-range orange-basil chicken ($5), or quinoa-crusted day boat fish ($7). The restaurant has also established a relationship with Feeding South Florida. Dirt will donate 1 percent of sales to the organization and give healthy grab-and-go items to support Feeding South Florida’s Backpack Program, which provides food packs for children who don’t have access to meals on weekends. Dirt is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m." written by Laine Doss.

 

According to Eater :

"Soon you'll have another spot to load up on your veggies when DIRT opens in the South of Fifth neighborhood in Miami Beach this September. The restaurant describes itself as a "fine food served fast" concept with a "vegetable forward menu." The restaurant will offer options for breakfast, lunch and dinner, like savory oatmeal; egg bowls filled with vegetables, grains, and proteins; cold-pressed juices and smoothies with house-made almond and Brazil nut milk; "nourishing sandwiches" amongst other seasonal offerings." written by Olee Fowler.

 

According to Miami.com :

"The restaurant, which will be open seven days a week for breakfast, lunch and dinner, will feature a juice bar, build-your-own salads and plenty of other plant-based options. That's a natural fit for chef Jonathan Seningen, who previously helmed Elizabeth's Gone Raw in Washington, D.C., and trained with noted raw-foods chef Matthew Kenney." written by Evan S. Benn.

 

Stay tuned at Miami City Social for more information.

- See more at: http://www.miamicitysocial.com/dirt-opens-at-south-beach#sthash.zy0Ev00p.dpuf

Miami New Times: Dirt, Most Bizarrely Named Restaurant in History, Opens in SoFi

Written By Laine Doss | Originally appeared in Miami New Times

Dirt, the fast-casual eatery that features fresh locavore dining, opened for business yesterday. The restaurant, with perhaps the most bizarre name in local history, is located at 232 Fifth St. in Miami Beach. It serves a much-needed roster of affordable vegetable-forward items, although meatier options are also available.

Executive chef/co-founder Jonathan Seningen has partnered with chef de cuisine Nicole Votano for this restaurant, a move Seningen says is unique. "It's not often that you have two chefs with executive-level experience working in a restaurant, and it's unheard of to find two working in a counter-service restaurant like Dirt." Seningen says both chefs worked diligently on shaping the menu to be both healthful and delicious. "We're very focused on wellness, but every aspect of the menu, from our breakfast bowls to our sandwiches — even our beverages — have been designed by Nicole and me to give the guest a satisfying experience." Jeff LaTulippe rounds out the team as co-founder and general manager.

That means vegans, vegetarians, paleos, and regular people can all find something to eat at Dirt, according to Seningen. "We do not adhere to any one dietary restriction. Because Nicole and I participated in the vegan Conscious Bite Out dinner in June, many people have gotten the impression that we're strictly vegan. We are vegetable-centric with many vegan and vegetarian options, but we also offer sustainable proteins like grass-fed beef, cage-free eggs, pasture-raised poultry, and wild-caught fish. If you do have a dietary restriction or preference, we also have separate vegan- and paleo-only menus to make it easy for you to order."

Dirt will also offer nutritional information on menu items and will feature a large display showcasing its vendors, taking the chalkboard listing of farms where ingredients are sourced one step further.

Votano explains how she chooses vendors. "We support the local farm community as much as possible. I have personal relationships with all of our farmers and only choose ones who share Dirt's same passion for food that is packed with flavor.

"We're currently sourcing from over 20 farms and purveyors based in Florida, many of which are located in South Florida. We choose to work with so many farmers because we like to choose the best of what each farm has to offer — that way we can support as many as possible. A few farms we're currently supporting include Sun Fresh Farm & Ranch for cage-free eggs, lots and lots of produce from Swank Farms, and Little Haiti Community Garden for arugula, collard greens, and spinach. Our sous-chef goes to the farm twice a week at 5 in the morning to pick up produce. We're also working hard to put together a variety of events with local farms and vendors." Dirt also sources other products locally, using JoJo Tea, Argyle Coffee, and Zak the Baker.

Votano, who was most recently chef at Fooq's, is excited to collaborate on the menu with Seningen. "Jonny had put together a great menu before I joined the team. Since I have come onboard, it has evolved a lot, and it is in a place right now where we both feel really excited about it. We ultimately collaborated on every item, but there are definitely specific dishes where you will be able to pick out our culinary styles. I really enjoy working with him — both coming from fine-dining backgrounds with a French backbone, we have very similar philosophies of how to develop flavors in our food. Our time cooking together is always full of lots of laughs, and it always ends with deliciousness."

The menu will change according to what's available, and the menu will also incorporate the suggestions of local people devoted to keeping Miami healthy. Seningen explains," Our menu will be highly seasonal, and each season we're going to partner with a different member of the wellness community to bring Miami something fresh and new. Right now we're featuring the "DIRT xLululemon" salad by our friend Cristina Ramirez, the community ambassador from Lululemon on Lincoln Road. It includes Cristina's favorite fall ingredients, like spiced lentils, avocado, green apple, roasted sweet potato, a fig-and-oat crumble, and apple cider vinaigrette on a bed of baby lettuces, torn herbs, sunflower sprouts, kale, and spinach."

Though offering healthful options, the menu remains full of flavor with dishes such as the purity bowl ($12) — filled with açaí, strawberries, chia seeds, goji berries, almond and Brazil nut mylk, kiwi, banana, and granola — and the detox salad ($9), which starts with a base of grains or greens and adds roasted beets, shaved fennel, orange wedges, goat cheese, and toasted hazelnuts. Add a protein like grass-fed beef tenderloin ($7), free-range orange-basil chicken ($5), or quinoa-crusted day boat fish ($7).

The restaurant has also established a relationship with Feeding South Florida. Dirt will donate 1 percent of sales to the organization and give healthy grab-and-go items to support Feeding South Florida’s Backpack Program, which provides food packs for children who don’t have access to meals on weekends.

Dirt is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.

SunSentinel: New fast-casual restaurant named Dirt opens in Miami Beach

Originally appeared in SunSentinal

Dirt, a fast-casual restaurant graced with what the Miami New Times calls "perhaps the most bizarre name in local history," has opened on Fifth Street in Miami Beach.

The restaurant boasts "affordable vegetable-forward items" along with selections of "meatier options." It was founded by two chefs, Jonathan Seningen and Nicole Votano, who created the menu to be healthy and delicious.

To read the full story, click here for Miami New Times.

Miami Eater: Health Conscious Eatery, DIRT, Now Open on South Beach

Written by Olee Fowler | Originally appeared in Miami Eater

Fast casual restaurant opens in the South of Fifth neighborhood

"Fine Food Fast" restaurant, DIRT, has officially opened its doors. The fast-casual restaurant helmed by executive chef Jonathan Seningen and director of operations and chef de cuisine Nicole Votano, offers up a menu of vegetable-centric cuisine. The restaurant will feature breakfast, lunch and dinner with dishes like "create your own" toasts, seasonal veggie bowls, cold-pressed juices, smoothies and espresso-based drinks, all featuring nutritional information and ingredient origin right on them. We're also told that the restaurant has established a relationship with Feeding South Florida and has pledged to donate the equivalent of one percent of its sales to the non-profit organization. DIRT is now open at 232 5th Street from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily.

Miami New Times: Seed Food and Wine Festival 2015 at Mana Wynwood

Written by Karli Evans | Originally appeared in Miami New Times

Seed returned November 18 through 22 for a second year of highlighting the area's best in vegan dining. On Saturday, November 21, more than 80 restaurants and lifestyle brands descended upon Mana Wynwood to showcase the best in plant-based and cruelty-free living. Check out the healthy smiles from this year's Tasting Village.

Photography by Karli Evans

SoFlaNights.com: DIRT Opens in Miami Beach

Originally appeared on SoFlaNights.com

DIRT, Miami Beach’s eagerly awaited “fine food fast” eatery, opens its doors on Monday, November 23, 2015. The counter-service restaurant will nourish health-conscious consumers with locally-sourced, vegetable-forward items all day long. Located on Fifth Street between Collins and Washington Avenues, DIRT‘s mission is simple and straightforward: to create innovative, delicious, healthy cuisine that you can feel good about putting into your body. DIRT is committed to serving up its local, sustainable food with an emphasis on personal, warm hospitality. The environment complements the food perfectly-it’s bright, sleek, and uplifting. With Executive Chef Jonathan Seningen and Director of Operations and Chef de Cuisine Nicole Votano leading the kitchen, guests can enjoy DIRT’s chef-driven fare at any time of day. DIRT will be open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. @DIRTeatclean

Rando Miami: DIRT Bringing "Fine Food Fast" to South Beach Starting Monday

Written by Katy Coffield | Originally appeared in Rando Miami

dirtmenu-sample (124 of 224)edited.jpg

DIRT, Miami Beach's eagerly awaited "fine food fast" eatery, is finally opening its doors on Monday! The counter-service restaurant will nourish health-conscious consumers with locally-sourced, vegetable-forward items all day long.
 
Located on Fifth Street between Collins and Washington Avenues, DIRT's mission is simple and straightforward: to create innovative, delicious, healthy cuisine that you can feel good about putting into your body. DIRT is committed to serving up its local, sustainable food with an emphasis on personal, warm hospitality. The environment complements the food perfectly-it's bright, sleek, and uplifting.
 
With Executive Chef Jonathan Seningen and Director of Operations and Chef de Cuisine Nicole Votano leading the kitchen, guests can enjoy DIRT's chef-driven fare at any time of day. Breakfast will offer a wide variety of options, including savory or sweet market-run oatmeal. Chefs Jonathan and Nicole will collaborate to create each day's flavors based on what is at peak quality each day: picture black truffle-scented oatmeal with English peas and Parmigiano Reggiano topped with a fried egg, or sweet oatmeal spiked with honey-roasted pineapple, toasted coconut, and dried cranberries. Mornings will also feature a "create your own" option: start with local eggs from Sun Fresh Farm and Ranch on crunchy Zak the Baker multigrain toast or herb farro drizzled with olive oil; then add avocado, kale, caramelized onions, or roasted fennel; and if that's not enough, you can top off your sandwich or bowl with organic pepperjack cheese or house-made chicken apple sausage.
 
Lunch will include a vast assortment of vegetable-centric options, as well as a few classics with a healthful culinary twist. "I am really loving our seasonal bowl right now," says Chef Nicole. "It starts with a butternut squash cashew 'cream' which is topped with roasted vadouvan curry cauliflower, quinoa, and arugula. It's then finished off with pomegranate and spiced pumpkin seeds for some crunchy texture. It's the kind of dish that even a carnivore can eat without missing the meat."
 
DIRT has also carefully planned its beverage program, starting with highly skilled baristas who will handcraft espresso-based drinks using DIRT's very own private label coffee (house-made nut milk available at no extra charge). Not a coffee drinker? Start your day off with a chef-driven smoothie, cold-pressed juice, or a cup of JoJo tea instead. For a nightcap and during weekend brunch, DIRT will serve a very unique selection of wine and sake cocktails created by Chef Jonathan, in addition to 4 local beers on tap.
 
Transparency is also a vital part of DIRT's core values-all ingredients have been carefully selected by the two chefs. "Guests will know exactly what they're eating-nutritional information and ingredient origin will be displayed in the restaurant, online, and on printed menus. A focal point of the restaurant will be a large display used to inform guests about the origin of our ingredients. It will also highlight local vendors and partners with whom we work closely," says Co-Founder and General Manager Jeff LaTulippe.
 
"We're offering our guests a vast array of options," LaTulippe continues. "There's something for every dietary restriction or personal preference-paleo, vegan, pescatarian, gluten-free, you name it. But the best part is it's all delicious, approachable, and clean, down-to-earth cuisine...that's why we call it DIRT."
 
"We want to elevate the idea of what a counter-service restaurant could be, and we want our guests to enjoy themselves no matter what they choose to eat or drink," says Chef Jonathan. "We've put just as much care into selecting our sustainable wines and crafting refreshing cocktails as we've put into creating our salads, juices, and breakfast bowls."
 
Prior to co-founding DIRT, Chef Jonathan spent nearly 25 years crafting inventive, sustainable cuisine. He was most recently Executive Chef at Elizabeth's Gone Raw, Washington, D.C.'s premier vegan eatery, after cutting his teeth in some of the finest kitchens in New York City (Atlas, Artisanal, and Chanterelle) and Washington, D.C. (Le Paradou, Hook, OYA, and SAX).
 
Chef Nicole began her career at Bradley Ogden's One Market Restaurant in San Francisco before moving on to the Biltmore Hotel, Michelle Bernstein Catering, and the fast casual Crumb on Parchment, where she was also Executive Chef. Chef Nicole most recently helmed the kitchen at Fooq's in downtown Miami, which she helped build from the ground up, during which time she was included in Modern Luxury's 2015 "5 Chefs to Watch".
 
Beyond its sustainable approach to food, DIRT has already embraced a charitable approach to the community. The restaurant has established a relationship with Feeding South Florida and has pledged to donate the equivalent of 1% of its sales to the non-profit organization from the day the doors open. DIRT will donate healthy grab-and-go items to support Feeding South Florida's Backpack Program, which provides food packs for children who don't have access to meals over the weekend.
 
In addition to DIRT's commitment to delicious food and philanthropy, the eatery is the only restaurant south of Orlando to earn certification by the United States Healthful Food Council's Responsible Epicurean and Agricultural Leadership (REAL) program, a nationally recognized mark of excellence for environmental stewardship, high-quality sourcing, and holistic nutrition.
 
For more information, please visit www.dirteatclean.com and follow @DIRTeatclean on social media.

The future of medicine is food

Written by Deena Shanker | This originally appeared in Quartz.

In between anatomy and biochemistry, medical students in the US are learning how to sauté, simmer and season healthy, homemade meals.

Since 2012, first and second year students at Tulane University School of Medicine in Louisiana have been learning how to cook. Since the program launched, Tulane has built the country’s first med school-affiliated teaching kitchen and become the first medical school to count a chef as a full-time instructor.

Sixteen med schools have now licensed the center’s curriculum, as have two non-medical schools, the Children’s Hospital San Antonio-Sky Lakes Residency Program and the Nursing School at Northwest Arkansas Community College. In fact, about 10% of America’s medical schools are teaching their students how to cook with Tulane’s program, Tim Harlan, who leads Tulane’s Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine, told the James Beard Foundation conference last month. It also offers continuing medical education programs with a certification for culinary medicine, for doctors, physicians assistants, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and registered dietitians.

The program, developed with culinary school Johnson & Wales, helps doctors give real health advice to their patients, says Harlan, who’s both a chef and a doctor. As he says in the video below: “We’re not talking about nutrition, we’re talking about food.”

“We translate the preponderance of dietary evidence,” which Harlan told Quartz supports the oft-praised Mediterranean diet, “for the American kitchen.” That includes consideration of cost as well as nutritional value—diet-related illnesses like obesity are often linked to low income communities, including the New Orleans community that Tulane’s kitchen also serves. This also works out well for training would-be doctors, says Harlan, who are usually on a stringent budget themselves.

The cooking classes are supplemented with lectures, reading and team-based problem solving as well, and though coursework begins broadly for first and second year students—with an overview of the Mediterranean diet and basic knife handling skills included in the first “module”—Harlan says they are developing about 30 more modules for third and fourth year students. Those will focus on specific ailments like congestive heart failure, HIV and celiac disease.

Fans of the program, including both doctors and chefs, are hoping it will be part of a major shift in the way doctors communicate with their patients about nutrition, especially amid rising rates of obesity and other diet-related illnesses. Currently less than half of American primary care physicians offer their patients specific guidance on diet, physical activity or weight control, a 2011 study found. “The fact that doctors are now learning to cook is like a revolution,” said Sam Kass, a former White House chef and senior nutrition policy advisor, at the James Beard conference.

While it’s still early days for the Tulane program, two separate studies have shown its effectiveness—for both the patients and med students alike. (Both studies included authors from the Goldring Center.) The first, which looked at patients with Type 2 Diabetes, found, for example, that those that who participated in the program saw a major drop in total cholesterol, while those who did not participate saw an increase. The second found that medical students also benefited: They not only thought nutrition advice was important for their patients, but for themselves, too. By the second year, the participating med students were eating significantly more fruits and vegetables than they had previously.

Harlan expects a sea change to take place in the way doctors treat chronic illness—and the way insurance charges for it. At the conference, Kass described a future where doctors write recipes as prescriptions and insurance companies treat food as a reimbursable expense. (There is, of course, a strong economic argument in favor of a prevention-based approach to health.) Harlan predicts that care plans will eventually include menu planning, recipes and maybe even programming to get the ingredients delivered to patients. “Call me up in ten years and let’s see if that’s true.”

Ft Lauderdale Daily: Seed Food & Wine Festival Returns To South Florida This Month To Show That Plant-Based Eating Can Be Delicious

Written by Lyssa Goldberg | Originally appeared in Gold Coast's Ft. Lauderdale Daily

Vegans, vegetarians and open-minded eaters, there's a plant-based food and wine festival coming to South Florida, and it begins next week.

Seed Food and Wine Festival will take place in Miami Beach and Miami's Wynwood Arts District from Nov. 18 to Nov. 22. Launched last year, the event is designed to "showcase the delicious side of plant-based living, helping to fuel mainstream acceptance of sustainability and prompting a major change going forward."

The 2015 edition of the festival will feature local culinary talent, leaders in the vegan community and health food celebrities, such as former NBA star and vegan wine owner John Salley and wellness advocate Rich Roll.

“Some of the biggest names in the plant-based world will be joining us and helping to make history…," SEED co-founder Alison Burgos said in a release.

During the five-day festival, Miami Beach and Wynwood will play host to a yoga brunch, a Movies & Munchies film screening amid botanical gardens, a 5K run through mural-painted streets and more. In addition, South Florida blogger Burger Beast will guest judge the first-ever Plant Based Burger Battle to crown America's Best Veggie Burger.

Participating chefs from top Miami restaurants include Jonathan Seningen of DIRT, Brad Kilgore of Alter, Jamie DeRosa of Tongue & Cheek, Chef Taco of Jugofresh, Todd Erickson of Haven and Amber Antonelli of The Naked Bite.

The main attraction is the Seed Festival Day and Tasting Village in Wynwood (for which we have a pair of tickets up for grabs!), where guests can sample plant-based eats from over 80 restaurants and bakeries, as well as vegan juices, wines and spirits. Attendees will also enjoy chef demonstrations, a beer garden, fitness zone, yoga lounge, crafts, edible gardening demos and a cruelty-free beauty bar.

 

Schedule of Events:

  • Wednesday, Nov. 18, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.: Movies & Munchies Screening of "May I Be Frank" ($25 early, $30 regular, $40 door)
  • Thursday, Nov. 19, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.: First Annual Plant Based Burger Battle at the Eden Roc Hotel ($50 early bird, $55 regular, $60 door)
  • Friday, Nov. 20, noon to 5 p.m.: Food Forward Industry Conference in Miami Beach ($50 regular)
  • Friday, Nov. 20, 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.: Future of Food Dining Experience at the Raleigh Hotel Miami Beach ($125 early bird, $130 regular)
  • Friday, Nov. 20, 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.: An Evening with Chef Chad Sarno in Miami Beach ($125 early bird, $130 regular)
  • Saturday, Nov. 21, 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.: Seed Wynwood 5K Run, Yoga, Meditation and Festival Day Package ($60 early bird, $65 regular)
  • Saturday, Nov. 21, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.: Seed Festival Day and Tasting Village at MANA Wynwood ($45 early bird, $50 regular, $55 door)
  • Saturday, Nov. 21, 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.: Made In Miami Farm to Table Dinner, Tongue & Cheek ($135 early bird, $140 regular)
  • Sunday, Nov. 22, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Mantra Yoga + Brunch with Dawn B at Thompson Miami Beach Hotel ($50 early bird, $55 regular, $60 door)
  • Sunday, Nov. 22, 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.: Sprouts Kids Day at Miami Beach Botanical Gardens ($15 early bird, $20 regular, $25 door)

Want to make a weekend of it? 

Miami Beach boutique hotel Circa 39, which completed a multi-million dollar renovation last year, offers a Would You Wynwood package for destination vacationers looking to explore the culture of Miami's arts district.

Along with 10 percent off best available rates, guests who reserve a two-night stay at Circa 39 can enjoy a daily breakfast buffet at the hotel's Jules Kitchen, a complimentary craft cocktail at WunderBar, bike rental for the day in Wynwood, and a tour and tasting at Wynwood Brewery (promo code: PKGWYNWOOD).

For more information about the festival or to purchase tickets, visit seedfoodandwine.com. To enter our ticket giveaway to Seed Food and Wine's Tasting Village, click here.